Non government organizations (NGOs)  enjoy the full support of FWS as they pursue state-level bans of ivory sales.  Anyone who believes that the Animal Rights activists and the NGOs who lobbied for this rule will be satisfied with this regulation is mistaken.
To pass this rule, FWS and NGOs suppressed the fact that elephant poaching has been declining since 2011.  A combination of enhanced law enforcement in Africa and Asia along with a drop in demand for commodities like ivory were already achieving a desired reduction in illegal elephant killing.
The reason why passage of this rule was important is because later this year CITES is going to meet in South Africa where NGOs are working to end consumptive trade of ALL threatened or endangered wildlife.  Their goal is to end any more discussion of “sustainable use,” the most effective conservation policy in the world.  They are shifting from seeking a balance between wildlife and the people who live with them to a more pure animal rights agenda.  This destructive policy strips all economic value from wildlife other than a few animals in scenic parks that are maintained for tourists.  The ivory ban exemplifies the hostility that animal rights groups hold for sustainable use, and that irrationality is why this ban will actually harm elephant populations that are rendered nuisances to local African communities.
The certain failure of this policy is why Animal Rights activists won’t stop here.  Wildlife populations will continue to die off as governments shift land use policies from wildlife to more productive uses like agriculture or domesticated herds.  Meanwhile, Animal Rights groups will use each dead animal as a fundraiser and argue for ever more stringent enforcement of failed policies.
We need to continue the fight against state ivory bans.  Wherever possible, prevent individual states from enacting legislation that will further muddy the waters.  So far we ( YOU and the Elephant Protection Assoc., Knife Rights, NRA and other like minded organizations) have prevented ivory bans in all states except New Jersey, New York, California, Washington and Hawaii.  That’s a pretty good record when you consider about half of the country had pending legislation in one form or another over the past two years.  Ironically, the federal ban gives us another tool to stop states from wasting resources on a state-level ban.
Second, we need to continue to engage politicians.  An administration that truly cares about private property rights and genuine wildlife conservation can reverse this rule. NGOs will continue to fundraise off of crisis they create and then divert some of those proceeds to politicians in order to keep their revenue streams flowing.  This ivory ban is corrupt in every sense of the word.  If the people profiting from this go unchallenged, then they will continue to exploit and expand upon the falsehoods and misconceptions that enable their behavior.
What about YOUR state?
Non government organizations (NGOs) enjoy the full support of FWS as they pursue state-level bans of ivory sales. Anyone who believes that the Animal Rights activists and the NGOs who lobbied for this rule will be satisfied with this regulation is mistaken.
To pass this rule, FWS and NGOs suppressed the fact that elephant poaching has been declining since 2011. A combination of enhanced law enforcement in Africa and Asia along with a drop in demand for commodities like ivory were already achieving a desired reduction in illegal elephant killing.
The reason why passage of this rule was important is because later this year CITES is going to meet in South Africa where NGOs are working to end consumptive trade of ALL threatened or endangered wildlife. Their goal is to end any more discussion of “sustainable use,” the most effective conservation policy in the world. They are shifting from seeking a balance between wildlife and the people who live with them to a more pure animal rights agenda. This destructive policy strips all economic value from wildlife other than a few animals in scenic parks that are maintained for tourists. The ivory ban exemplifies the hostility that animal rights groups hold for sustainable use, and that irrationality is why this ban will actually harm elephant populations that are rendered nuisances to local African communities.
The certain failure of this policy is why Animal Rights activists won’t stop here. Wildlife populations will continue to die off as governments shift land use policies from wildlife to more productive uses like agriculture or domesticated herds. Meanwhile, Animal Rights groups will use each dead animal as a fundraiser and argue for ever more stringent enforcement of failed policies.
We need to continue the fight against state ivory bans. Wherever possible, prevent individual states from enacting legislation that will further muddy the waters. So far we ( YOU and the Elephant Protection Assoc., Knife Rights, NRA and other like minded organizations) have prevented ivory bans in all states except New Jersey, New York, California, Washington and Hawaii. That’s a pretty good record when you consider about half of the country had pending legislation in one form or another over the past two years. Ironically, the federal ban gives us another tool to stop states from wasting resources on a state-level ban.
Second, we need to continue to engage politicians. An administration that truly cares about private property rights and genuine wildlife conservation can reverse this rule. NGOs will continue to fundraise off of crisis they create and then divert some of those proceeds to politicians in order to keep their revenue streams flowing. This ivory ban is corrupt in every sense of the word. If the people profiting from this go unchallenged, then they will continue to exploit and expand upon the falsehoods and misconceptions that enable their behavior.
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